• Details
  • More
  • Trevor Martin: Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue

    Home  /  Events  /  Current Page
       Sunday, February 24th, 2013
       7:00 pm

Trevor Martin: Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue

Home  /  Events  /  Current Page

Trevor Martin: Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue
February 22nd 8:00 pm
February 23rd 8:00pm
February 24th 7:00pm
Links Hall
3435 N. Sheffield Avenue, Suite 207
 $15 General Admission / $10 Students
Written and performed by Trevor Martin
Photographer credit Katelynn Ralston.
http://www.vdb.org/artists/trevor-martin
BIO

Trevor Martin is an artist, educator, and arts administrator living and working in Chicago. His performance and sculptural works have been presented in museums, galleries, and alternative spaces in Chicago, New York, Cleveland, Tucson, and Florence, Italy as well as places in between. In addition, Trevor has curated numerous projects with a focus on both live performance and performance for video. He received his BFA (1992) from Transylvania University and MFA (1998) from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). Trevor currently serves as the Director of Exhibitions at SAIC, teaches in the School’s performance art department, and maintains a collaborative practice with San Francisco-based artist Kym Olsen and Chicagoan Vicki Fowler.

 

DESCRIPTION

Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue is a revisionist response to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Layered with song as well as dialogue lifted from the original play, this live performance moves away from the canonized story toward a place of potentiality, confrontation, and the unraveling of lies.

In this afterword, a love triangle is established. The third party is male, but not a recognizable character in the original plot. Historically unnamed, he appears in the glow of flashlights and speaks from the shadows reinvesting the identities of Romeo and Juliet, both dead, as ghosts willing to breach the bounds of the living to haunt another chance at love. The consequences fracture time, place, and self—colliding the Renaissance with the contemporary, the straight with the gay, the living with the dead. Here, narrative is unstable. It is a shifting equation—death begins this journey where love meets no guarantees and sexual certitude remains a fiction of time.